Installing SABnzbd on a Raspberry Pi running OSMC

For quite some time I’ve been running SABnzbd on a PC, downloading files, and then transferring them over the local network to a USB drive attached to a Raspberry Pi which is running OSMC. There’s a Linux version of SABnzbd which means I can cut out the PC and have the Pi handle the downloads. It’ll mean I can queue up the downloads from a web interface running on whatever device I have to hand, like an iPad.

First Try

The initial installation of SABnzbd was quite easy;

sudo apt-get install python-openssl unrar par2

sudo apt-get install sabnzbdplus

Edit the settings so that the web client starts up on port 8085..

sudo nano /etc/default/sabnzbdplus

USER=osmc
HOST=0.0.0.0
PORT=8085

sudo service sabnzbdplus restart

This then allowed me to connect to SABnzbd and transfer over all my settings that I was using on my PC.

Delayed Start

What I found was that SABnzbd started before the USB drive was properly mounted by OSMC, so I disabled the main service from starting up, and added a script to wait for the USB drive to get mounted at a particular path.

There was a good forum post here that pointed me in the right direction.

Disable the default service…

sudo update-rc.d sabnzbdplus disable

Write a quick shell script to wait for the directory/USB drive to be mounted…

nano /home/osmc/startsabnzb.sh

#!/bin/sh

# Wait for this folder to be mounted...
DIR=/media/Elements

while [ ! -d "$DIR" ]; do
sleep 120
done

/etc/init.d/sabnzbdplus start

chmod a+x /home/osmc/startsabnzb

Add the script to system startup…

sudo nano /etc/rc.local

/home/osmc/startsabnzb.sh

Upgrading

The version of SABnzbd that installed above was very dated. That repo doesn’t get updated very often. Here’s how I updated it to the latest version.

sudo su root

echo "deb http://ppa.launchpad.net/jcfp/nobetas/ubuntu xenial main" | tee -a /etc/apt/sources.list
echo "deb http://ppa.launchpad.net/jcfp/sab-addons/ubuntu xenial main" | tee -a /etc/apt/sources.list

apt-key adv --keyserver hkp://pool.sks-keyservers.net:11371 --recv-keys 0x98703123E0F52B2BE16D586EF13930B14BB9F05F

sudo apt-get update

Upgrading sabyenc

This solved the issue where SABnzbd was complaining that sabyenc wasn’t the right version. It uses the 2nd repo (sab-addons) we added in the steps above.

sudo apt-get install python-sabyenc

Final thoughts

SABnzbd runs quite well on the Pi. It is a lot slower than it was on a PC.. it only manages about 3 MB/s on the download on a wired connection (compared to 6 MB/s on a Wifi connection on a laptop), and unpacking is slow.

However, the files are unpacked onto the device which I was manually copying the files to anyway, so that saves time.

Sharing attached USB storage in OSMC using NFS

As well as being attached to the living room TV for use as a media centre, I also wanted to be able to use my Raspberry Pi 3 B+ as a simple NAS for other TVs in the house to stream from.

The Pi I’m using has a 1Tb desktop hard drive attached to it over USB, and I wanted a way to easily share the contents. It was actually relatively easy to set up… this is how to do it in OSMC;

  1. Install SSH to OSMC via the Store
  2. Now you can remote shell into the Pi to set up the network share
  3. Install NFS services using the following command;
    sudo apt-get install nfs-kernel-server
  4. Edit the file shares;
    sudo nano /etc/exports

    Add a share like this;

    /media 192.168.1.0/255.255.255.0(rw,fsid=0,insecure,no_subtree_check,async,crossmnt)

    (crossmnt fixed an issue where I could see the folders but no files)

  5. Restart the NFS service;
    sudo /etc/init.d/nfs-kernel-server restart

That’s it.. you should now be able connect to the Raspberry Pi and see the files on any of the USB drives you’ve got attached.

Automated mains socket power-off for OSMC on a Raspberry Pi

I’ve chosen to replace an ageing mini-PC which I’ve used since 2010 with a new Raspberry Pi 3 B+ running OSMC. It makes for a really capable media centre which can playback newer h.265 HEVC video files at 1080p without any problems, or it can serve 4K files over NFS to a box with a hardware h.265 chip like the Fire TV Box.

This form factor is easy to take on holiday and you can use an old infrared remote control (or Harmony learning remote) with it too.

However, the one thing I’ve struggled with is how to make it easy for my family to use in regard to switching it on and off. The Pi doesn’t have a power button. Some power supplies have an inline rocker switch, which almost fits the bill. I wanted something more automated.

Fortunately I had a spare Energenie power socket from a previous project where I use one to turn off our bass speaker when the TV isn’t on. These power sockets are controlled remotely (over RF) from a Pi which you attach an Energenie control board/shield to.

What I’ve done with the Pi 3 is have it powered through an Energenie socket, and set up a service that executes when it detects OSMC is shutting down. That service will make a quick HTTP call to the Pi with the Energenie controller shield, which will in turn send an RF signal to turn the mains socket off.

 

osmcshutdown

 

Here’s how you can set it up like I have…

Scripts for the Pi running OSMC

First, add a new service script.. create a new file in this folder;

/etc/systemd/system/callenergenie.service

Then enable it with;

sudo systemctl enable callenergenie.service

There are a couple of useful things happening in this service, the After parameter makes sure the code runs before the network code is shut down, and Conflicts parameter is looking for OSMC shutting down.

Now add a helper script… this will make the webserver call as a background task, so control will be given back to the service immediately, rather than it waiting for the wget to complete.

/home/osmc/callenergenie.sh

This calls the PHP script, telling it which socket to turn off, and how long to delay before sending the command, which we’re doing so that the Pi has time to shut down before the power is cut.

Scripts for the Pi with the Energenie shield

This is the PHP script I added to the other Pi which was already configured to be a PHP web server.

/var/www/html/callenergenie.php

To allow PHP to run the script as root, I needed to add the Apache user to the list of sudo-ers.. not that secure tho :( I’d be interested in anyone who knows how to run the Energenie scripts a regular user.. their Python doesn’t like it when it’s not root.

nano /etc/sudoers

www-data ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD:ALL

The nice thing about the PHP script is that we can actually call it to turn the Pi on remotely too.. so you could configure that into a widget on your phone, or add it to Alexa.