Controlling Power Sockets using a Raspberry Pi

The subwoofer we had in our home cinema setup died a few weeks ago, so I did my research and found a nice replacement. The only thing I didn’t spot was the fact it never goes into standby if there’s no signal (unlike the old one). I tried using some eco plugs which turn off peripherals when the TV was turned off.. but it learns the TV remote signals, and completely turns the TV off as well.. meaning that you have to hit the power button twice to turn the TV back on; that doesn’t work well with the Harmony all-in-one remote we use.

What I decided to do was buy an Energenie socket, which can be switched on/off wirelessly from a Raspberry Pi. The kit comes with 2 sockets and a transmitter to attach to the GPIO headers on the Pi, and costs about £20.

In my subwoofer scenario I basically want it switched on when the TV is on, and off when the TV is off. The TV has a Chromecast plugged into it which is visible on my local network. If you’ve got a Smart TV on your network, maybe that’ll be visible in the same way. So when the TV/Chromecast appear on the network, we know to switch on the power socket.

energeniesockets

Here’s the small Energenie transmitter attached to the GPIO headers on my B+.. it’s pretty tiny and the case I’ve got still fits over the top. Notice the small hole where you can attach an aerial.. if you want extra range, then you’ll need to solder one on.. I added a 135mm wire, since the range I got out of it just wasn’t enough to get from the dining room cupboard to the living room.

energeniepi

 

To put this together, we can use the Raspberry Pi Network Spy code I wrote in my previous blog posts on element14;

Raspberry Pi Network Spy – Part 1 – Initial Setup + d/b Schema
Raspberry Pi Network Spy – Part 2 – D/b Setup + PHP for the scanner

All we need is a new PHP page that’ll call one of the functions we’ve already written.. we need a list of the MAC addresses that are currently visible on the network, then check whether the Chromecast is there. Once we know whether the TV/Chromecast is on or off, we then call a Python script that will turn the Energenie socket on/off.

Here’s the PHP;

arp-chromecast.php

The Python script could follow the Energenie example script, but there’s actually an even more simple Python package which I’ve used in this project. To install it I did the following;

sudo apt-get install python-pip
sudo pip install energenie

Then I wrote this helper Python script (which we’ll call from PHP) that accepts a couple of parameters, like this callenergenie.py [on|off] [switch_number];

callenergenie.py

from energenie import switch_on, switch_off
import sys

if len(sys.argv)==1:
print ‘Please specify arguments like this callenergenie.py [on|off] [switch_number]’
print ‘eg. callenergenie.py on 1’
print ‘eg. callenergenie.py off 2′
else:
on_or_off = sys.argv[1]
which_switch = int(sys.argv[2])

if (on_or_off==’on’):
print ‘Switching on ‘, which_switch
switch_on(which_switch)

if (on_or_off==’off’):
print ‘Switching off ‘, which_switch
switch_off(which_switch)

Now that we’ve written the PHP & Python, all we need to do is run the PHP every minute to scan the network and do the switching. We’ll do this using another cron job;

crontab -e

*/1 * * * * sudo /usr/bin/php /var/www/arp-chromecast.php

Using Wireshark and MITM to explore a STB

I’ve recently bought a new Freeview HD box from 3view. It has a whole host of features and can be considered a “connected” device. As with most high-end set-top-boxes (STB) it pulls software firmware updates from the web, and I was interested to see where it went to get these updates & how it knew they were available.

I know about using tools to sniff network traffic, but have only done this to sniff traffic coming directly out of the PC I’m running the capture software on. Buying this 3view box gave me more of an inventive to expand my knowledge & figure out how to capture the traffic from other devices.

It was actually relatively easy. I decided to do a Machine in the Middle (MITM) ‘attack’ which was documented over at the Wireshark wiki.

In my case I didn’t have 2 network cards, but did have a laptop with one network card, and a wireless card. In Windows XP I bridged the NIC to the Wireless adapter, then plugged in a cross-over cable that linked the 3view box to my laptop. Then, after a bit of messing about with IP addresses it started working.. my 3view box was accessing my wireless router via my laptop.

Now that all the traffic from the 3view box was going via my laptop, all I then needed to do was fire up Wireshark & take a look at the packets.

Intercepting the traffic allowed me to see where the box was going for it’s updates, and the User Agent. That’s been documented over at the 3viewer community website I set up for 3view owners.

http://3viewer.elementfx.com/

Drive Map Pro 1.6 Released

Drive Map Pro is a great piece of Windows software for organising all the servers you connect to. It’s primary purpose is to give you easy access to mapping a network drive with the minimum of fuss, however it does a lot more that that, including managing your VNC/Radmin connections too!

The latest version of Drive Map Pro (version 1.6) is now available to registered users and includes the following:

  • Lots of bug-fixes :-D
  • Ability to have multiple UNC drive mappings under one entry, syntax is ‘\serverc$,d$,whatever’, which gives you the ability to map to any/all 3 of those drives without clogging up your list of servers!
  • Middle-click launches the application you’ve associated with the server.. saves a click or two!
  • Store notes against each entry.. handy for storing box info, like who’s the administrator
  • More application preferences (like auto-hide DriveMapPRO after launching an application)

Click here for more information on Drive Map Pro.

Drive Map Pro 1.6

Mapping a drive has never been easier!!